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Yarmouth Police officer Sean Gannon was killed Thursday by a career criminal who racked up at least 111 prior offenses. Gannon, 32, became Yarmouth Police Department’s first full-time drug detection K-9 officer in 2011. Thomas Latanowich, 29, is accused of killing Gannon with a handgun. Nero, Gannon’s drug detection K-9, was shot in the face and neck, and is scheduled to undergo surgery Friday, according to Dennis Veterinary Hospital.

The shooting occurred in Barnstable, when Gannon and other officers were serving an arrest warrant at a home. Latanowich was arrested after a prolonged standoff, and it is unclear if Latanowich has any connection to the initial arrest warrant. Local resident Jacqueline Machado told reporters that the police “were very good, very skilled and very in control of the situation.”

Latanowich is described by Yarmouth police as a “notorious and violent” career criminal who has 111 prior charges on his record. A timeline provided by the Boston Globe documents Latanowich’s criminal history, which includes a September 2005 assault with a deadly weapon charge, a string of charges in early 2006 including battery, assault with a deadly weapon, and violating a restraining order, and most recently, allegations of assault and battery in December 2016.

After his release from jail in June 2014, Latanowich was to remain on probation until November of this year. Latanowich missed a home visit and a drug test on April 4th and 5th, and after failing to appear for both check-ins, an arrest warrant was issued on April 6th. Latanowich appeared in court on Friday and pled not guilty to charges of murder. He is currently held without bail.

WBZ4 Boston’s I-Team discovered Yarmouth Police had attempted to stop Latanowich for a traffic violation just ten days before the shooting. The suspect allegedly failed to stop after flagged by state police, before veering into a residential area and abandoning his vehicle. State police did not closely pursue Latanowich due to adverse weather conditions and potential bystanders. Latanowich did not have an active warrant at the time, but he was known to officials in the area as a perennial and violent offender.

Marie Piotte, who is identified as Latanowich’s ex-partner in previous charges against him, remarked that he was a “whole different person” when angered. “He would grab me, he would choke me.” Latanowich’s criminal history includes multiple entries where he is alleged to have beaten Piotte.

Originally facing a maximum of seven months after opening fire on Gannon and his K-9 partner, Latanowich now faces life in prison if convicted.

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